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Graham Fulton - Photographing Ghosts

Book launch, Street Level Photoworks, Saturday 14th March, 7pm. 

Photographing Ghosts is the new collection of poems by Scottish Poet Graham Fulton.

A sequence of dark travel poems that delves into the absurdities and confusion of the world and looks for the common denominators of humanity. It contains single line monotype
illustrations by artist Hugh Bryden.

It’s published by Roncadora Press and costs £10.

Graham Fulton is a long established figure on the Scottish poetry scene. He lives in Paisley, and began writing poetry in the 1980s when he attended Tom Leonard’s Paisley Writers workshop. His poetry has been published extensively in Europe and the USA in magazines such as Edinburgh Review, Ambit, Stand, Gutter, Dream State: the New Scottish Poets and Scottish Literature in the 20th Century.

His six other full-length book collections are Humouring the Iron Bar Man(Polygon,1990), Knights of theLower Floors (Polygon,1994), Open Plan (Smokestack Books, 2011), Full ScottishBreakfast (Red Squirrel Press, 2011), Reclaimed Land
(The Grimsay Press, 2013), One Day in the Life of Jimmy Denisovich (Smokestack Books, 2014).

He’s also produced over 15 pamphlets, many of which combine poetry, photography and illustration, and is co-author of Pub Dogs of Glasgow which was published recently by Freight Books. He was also involved with an anthology of translated Palestinian poetry called A Bird is Not aStone published in 2014. New book collections are due to be published over the next 2 years by Red Squirrel Press, Salmon Poetry, Penniless Press and Freight.

‘I’ve always been a huge fan.’

Liz Lochhead

‘Fulton’s poetry is accessible, poignant, warm and funny, throwing historical
and modern icons in amongst the ordinary with surprising, surreal results.
A true pop-cultural poet, crackling and fizzing with empathy.’

Alan Bissett

‘One of the outstanding attributes of Paisley-based poet Graham Fulton is his clarity.
His poems present things in everyday language and invite us to see the poetry in them.
He’s also very funny. As we know, poetry books don’t sell well, but it would be gratifying
to see this one becoming the exception.

The Herald